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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
grew up in a south africa divided by apartheid. >> the anc has two options, continue doing same, which is the political party it is now, or it can make itself into a party of the 21st century. so it has to think about the young voters, the people who were born after apartheid, born even in the 1990s who are now the youngest voters in south africa, those are the voters that it has to create a strategy for, the voters they have to convince to go to the polls and vote. >> this is a crossroads isn't it? >> yes, it is a crossroads, it cannot claim just to be the party that liberated south africa, it has to create more positive claims. >> it can't rely on nelson mandela and its history. >> right. but it's about the history of libertying south africa from white rule. it is a history that doesn't build houses. it is a history that builds clinics and makes schools run. they have to try to put in place the kind of civil service that delivers that. >> because searveg has a lot of -- searve south africa has af problems it is dealing with. how much of that should be blamed on the anc, the ruling pa
in the country. that's because he was a member of the anc the liberation movement that not apartheid in south africa for decades. movement that the white apartheid threw mandela in prison for being a part of, giving him a light sentence after releasing him after 27 years in captivity, even then, even in the summer of 1990, those first months after he had finally been let out of jail. even as south africa was finally starting to take those first frazzled steps away from apartheid in towards real genuine multi-racial draerks even then as nelson mandela was being hailed as a hero, all across the globe, the united states government officially considered him a member of a terrorist organization. they forced him to endure the endignitary of receiving a waiver of being told in effect, sure, come on in, we will give you some rewards, call you a hero. you are the revepgsception. the rest of the anc, we think they are terrorists. it wasn't until 2008 that congress passed and president george w. bush, not his father, it wasn't until five years ago the u.s. government got around to signing legislation th
winnie mandela was, what was apartheid, what is anc, that is african national congress. it took years leading up to dive divestment. because i was fortunate enough to serve on the board of trans africa we were part of the strategy that not only did rallying and arrested at the embassy and took over the south african consulate in los angeles but economic sanctions were extremely important to put pressure on the south african government to help bring down the unconscionable apartheid. so it took work, hard work. >> there was a movement across the country as congressman mentioned on campuses everywhere. i was covering it. ron, you in congress with a number of leaders an then some republicans joining in to try to finally pass the legislation. you authored one piece of legislation. it was compromised and finally passed and overrode veto. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine wa
, which was always the goal of the anc. and whether one is from nigeria or tanzania or closer to home, mozambique, across africa people rallied behind the anc in that struggle. i think president mandela stood for freedom, and he now stands for integrity and perseverance. the continent needs to move towards that in terms of the next phase of the struggle, which is political freedom has been achieved now. economic freedom is necessary. >> speak a little about your own experience in relation to the perspective of nelson mandela, particularly when it comes to nonviolent protest, and in violence in africa, as well is the work you have done combating aids in africa. >> i really respect president mandela, again, because of his conviction. he was a person who started as he did, in terms of nonviolent struggle against apartheid regime, and at some point he realized the level of repression of the national party required a more robust response, which was moving towards arms struggle. leader likefound a erk who could negotiate with the national party that was now ready after the mass demonstratio
of anc fought on. one of the first stories i covered was in the anc township where it's zulu warriors from a hostile that marched in the dead of night and slaughtered 40 people women and children among them. so, you know, it was not a simple matter of de klerk deciding to negotiate and everything got easy. you know, white bitter enders assassinated the head of the communist party, one of the most promising young black leaders around that time. a bunch of kind of resistance types tried to storm one of the african so-called homelands. so there were people who tried to keep the fight going. but the balance just had had shift sod dramatically that, you know, de klerk was a realist. and they desperately needed a realist on the other side of the table. >> mr. delms, when i was talking about nelson mandela right before he was officially elected, he gave a lot of credit to the united states. i thought he was being very generous in saying our country was the most -- enemy of the world. do you think united states a as major player in getting him liber liberated and getting his party majority ru
that in time. but as you note, many regimes, many governments saw him and the anc as terrorists and responded accordingly. >> one of the things that's always struck me about nelson mandela's life was here was a guy who could have had the ultimate chip on his shoulder. and not once did you ever see or hear or read about public bitterne bitterness. nelson mandela never displayed any sort of public bitterness. >> i think nelson mandela, consistent with martin luther king and gandhi and others, i think recognized when he emerged from that prison cell that if he were going to lead south africa, he needed a message not only of reconciliation but of a multiracial south africa. and he did a great job in presenting that message. and i think he surprised people that when he emerged from 27 years of imprisonment, i don't think anyone can imagine what it would be like to spend that much time in a narrow jail cell, to be cut off and then to come back and be so lucid, so politically astute, so politically aware and really emerge as one of the great leaders of our times. >> donald, when we talk about mandel
a year to be members of the anc's customer loyalty program. they get at $10 discount after every $100 ticket purchases but now anc promises, quote, a chance to own a piece of the action at the same price as wall street investors, taking $2,500 of new stocks with no fees, the same terms to amc employees, hoping to raise $400 million in total, riegle is the nation's largest theater chain up 20% in the past 12 months but the customer loyalty program and to spin, studies show canceled on to a stock longer than regular investors. rather than sell and bailout true fans can buy more of it after a dip. tracy: my mom has one of those. dennis: this will be an interesting plan for moviegoers to buy stock they never would have heard about. ashley: this might follow suit. dennis: will free might be on that. ashley: as marijuana is legalized in some states one man is hoping to smoke industry competition in an attempt to establish what he calls the anheuser-busch of marijuana. justin hard field is investing in everything from retail stores, emerald green capital, sees a lot of green on the marijuana
and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's when we really started becoming friends and i had the honor of working with him throughout the entire span of his presidency and one of the things that sometimes gets lost in the incredible personal impact he made on the world because of the way he handled imprisonment is that he was a very, very good president. i think he was an extremely effective president of south africa. >> i remember when you and hillary clinton and the first lady toured that robben island cell where he had spent so many years back in 1998. what was that like? >> well, it was amazing. he talked to me about it and i'll never forget, one of the most enduring conversations i had with him over the many we had in our 20 year friendship was i said you know, i know how you
in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us next in the "newsroom." thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ are still high in acidic content. if your enamel is exposed to aci
and hope. >> the a.n.c. has struggled to fill full nelson mandela's vision. the system is crippled, school buildings falling apart and they have crowding. >> cape town is typical of the struggle. >> i wants to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10